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Posts Tagged ‘Revolutionary War’

Hic inter flumina nota : IN THE STEPS OF THE NEW JERSEY VERGIL

December 5, 2015 1 comment

 

A view of Crosswicks Creek from the former estate of Joseph Bonaparte, Bordentown.

For centuries, familiarity with Vergil’s poetry was such that the employment of his verses in inscriptions could be habitual, even unconscious. While these traces are far less frequent in the Garden State than in places of greater antiquity, the poet is no stranger to our landscape. Most citations still to be found are conscious and deliberate, and each has a story to tell. Read more…

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MOST FAITHFUL UNTO DEATH

December 16, 2012 Leave a comment
Details of windows at St. Ladislaus Church, in New Brunswick (above), and Our Lady of Mount Carmel, in Woodbridge (below).

Detail of window at St. Ladislaus Church, in New Brunswick, designed by Asztrik Kákonyi.

Ego sum, wrote Michael Kováts, libertate et natione Hungarica praeditus. But the facts seemed at variance with that proud introduction. As his letter went on to reveal, the 52-year-old Kováts had a record of long service to foreign powers, principally the king of Prussia, where despite a noble lineage he had been compelled to enroll in the army as a raw recruit. Through harsh discipline he had risen to be a captain in the Free Hussars, a light cavalry unit that took its uniform, tactics and name from his native Hungary. Nevertheless, Kováts faced strict limits on his vaunted liberty and, when he finally resigned his post and returned to his homeland, he was beset with personal and financial problems. Now, at the start of 1777, he was in France seeking a new employer, and not a European one.

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Tela inter Martia : A SALEM SOJOURN

Old Pittsgrove (formerly Pilesgrove) Presbyterian Church (1767)

In colonial New Jersey, all loyal and peaceful subjects of the Crown were guaranteed the right to “their Judgments and Consciences in matters of Religion.”[1]   A visit to one of the most pastoral areas of the state teaches us that the coexistence of different communities of faith does not always ensure peace within them.

William Tennent and his sons – all of them ministers – would become catalysts for controversy not long after their arrival from Ireland in 1718.  Read more…

Commota est et contremuit terra: THE SECOND BATTLE OF PRINCETON

Detail of the Princeton Battle Monument (dedicated 1922)

Most public inscriptions are acts of memory, but deliberate and highly selective ones. In fact, the story of their creation can be as fascinating and revealing as the story their creators have chosen to tell.

The Princeton Battle Monument, in a small park west of Princeton’s Nassau Street, recalls a pivotal episode in the Revolution. George Washington, hoping to surprise the enemy based at Nassau Hall, had overseen a daring midnight march over back roads, skirting the British forces camped expectantly near Trenton. Read more…

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